COVID-19 devastated California’s small businesses. Here are three that didn’t survive

After the COVID-19 pandemic forced nonessential businesses to temporarily shut down across Southern California, the Los Angeles Times invited readers to send in the names of businesses in their areas that had failed as a result. [#1] The Awesome Playground was in the first wave of Los Angeles businesses to close as a result of the pandemic, shutting its doors in March. Owner Kay Osorio opened the Awesome Playground in Highland Park 10 years ago. But when the coronavirus crisis began making headlines in Southern California, Osorio knew immediately it could have a devastating effect on her business. Unlike other businesses that have been able to pivot to outdoor-only or remote offerings, “we couldn’t come up with another way to deliver our service.” [#2] Sasha Jones had just one day in late July to clear out Cuties Coffee before its lease was taken over. “I got an email late Thursday afternoon, like, we need to get what we can out tomorrow, Friday,” the Cuties CEO said. For weeks, the threat of closure had loomed over the LGBTQ-owned and -operated coffee shop. Since the closure of the coffee shop, Cuties is continuing to operate without a physical space. [#3] When Alan Abdo negotiated with his landlord to end the lease for Olive Tree Restaurant, he remembers saying, “I can’t close fast enough. I’m losing money by the minute.” Olive Tree was a thriving, well-known Middle Eastern restaurant in Anaheim right up until the enforced business closures began.

Note: Small businesses have been devastated worldwide by the lockdown, yet most large corporations are thriving and the billionaires are making money hand over fist. So who is really benefitting from these lockdown measures? For more along these lines, see concise summaries of deeply revealing news articles on the coronavirus from reliable major media sources.

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Author: {Want To Know}

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