Media blackout over 1776 initiative’s launch to counter NY Times’ 1619 Project

The mainstream media blacked out news coverage of a counter-narrative history initiative launched by black academics this week.

The initiative, called 1776, is a direct counter-narrative initiative dedicated to debunking the New York Times’ 1619 Project.

One of 1776’s leading scholars, Bob Woodson, told the press that the 1619 Project’s message is a “lethal” narrative that perpetuates victimhood culture within the black community. The initiative’s mission is to “to offer alternative perspectives that celebrate the progress America has made on delivering its promise of equality and opportunity and highlight the resilience of its people. Our focus is on solving problems.”

In short, 1776’s goal is to provide an uplifting narrative to assert that despite its mistakes, America is not defined by its past failures. Woodson is a well known anti-poverty leader within the black community.

Compare 1776’s mission to the 1619 Project: The latter is described as “an ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began in August 2019, the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery” and “aims to reframe the country’s history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.”

The 1619 Project has been implemented in classrooms across the country and 1776 is an effort to reverse the trend.

“This garbage that is coming down from the scholars and writers from 1619 is most hypocritical because they don’t live in communities [that are] suffering,” Woodson said. “They are advocating something they don’t have to pay the penalty for.”

Right-leaning outlets such as the Washington Free Beacon, the Washington Times and the Washington Examiner covered 1776’s launch. No mainstream media outlet covered 1776’s launch and none of the project’s leading figures. Some of the more notable scholars behind the 1776 initiative are as follows:

  • Carol Swain, former political science professor at Princeton University
  • Clarence Page, a nationally-syndicated columnist and member of Chicago Tribune’s editorial board
  • Jason Hill, DePaul University philosophy professor

The mainstream media’s blackout should disappoint readers because 1776’s goal is to provide another perspective and historical narrative about America’s history. American schools should have access to multiple historical narratives to provide American children with as much information as possible and not be limited to the New York Times’ 1619 Project.


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Author: Spencer Irvine

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