Neuroscientists link three human brains together and they play Tetris

Neuroscientists from the project BrainNet have found a way to link human brains together using them in unison to solve complex problems and play the video game Tetris.

BrainNet is essentially a “multi-person non-invasive direct brain-to-brain interface for collaborative problem solving” that’s currently being tested by researchers from Carnegie Mellon University the University of Washington.

And yes the three human hosts heads remained attached during testing but it’s safe to say that all of that could change in the future.

According to CNet.com:

The team used “electroencephalograms” (EEGs) to record electric impulses from two human brains and “transcranial magnetic stimulation” (TMS) to deliver information to a third brain. The end result: an interface that allowed three human subjects to collaborate and solve Tetris problems using brain-to-brain communication.

In the test, two “senders” were connected to EEG sensors and communicated to a third person, the “receiver” via a TMS helmet with the ability to send flashes directly to the brain.

The two “senders” could see the game of Tetris being played, the “receiver” could not. The goal: send a message telling the receiver to either rotate or not rotate the Tetris piece, depending on how the game was going.

Do you want to be attached to the collective?

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Shepard Ambellas is an opinion journalist, analyst, and the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News & Politics (Intellihub.com). Shepard is also known for producing Shade: The Motion Picture (2013) and appearing on Travel Channel’s America Declassified (2013). Shepard is a regular contributor to Infowars. Read more from Shep’s World. Follow Shep on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to Shep’s YouTube channel.

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Author: Shepard Ambellas